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Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

In celebration of Artful Living’s 15th anniversary, we’ll be sharing some of our all-time favorite articles from the archives throughout the year. Here, we’ve rounded up our top 10 beauty stories for your reading pleasure.


Artful Living | Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Photography by Morgane Lay

Bobbi Brown on Confidence, Inclusivity and Aging Well

The beauty icon opens up about her favorite products, her first Vogue cover and more.


Artful Living | Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Photography by Christian Cody

The Men’s Beauty Revolution Has Officially Arrived

The growth of men’s beauty products has outpaced women’s for years — and brands are cashing in.


Artful Living | Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Photography by Carmen Palma

How Upcycled Beauty is Helping Fight Food Waste

Although it’s not a new phenomenon, this buzzy sustainability trend is combatting food waste.


Artful Living | Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Photography provided by Getty Images/Lambada

5 Extreme Beauty Treatments and Trends

From velaterapia to leech therapy, these treatments will take your beauty regimen to the extreme.


Artful Living | Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Photography by Victoria Campbell

Chris Plantan on the Well-Packed Cosmetic Bag

The tastemaker explains how to properly pack your cosmetic bag so you’re ready for that next vacation.


Artful Living | Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Photography provided by Hanacure

We Tried It: The Hanacure Face Mask

Find out what happened when we tried the at-home facial kit beloved by the Kardashian clan.


Artful Living | Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Photography provided by Billie Eilish Fragrances

How Beauty Products Became the Hottest Home Decor

Explore the trend and learn why savvy cosmetics brands are embracing chic design.


Artful Living | Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Photography provided by Lions Gate Films

Doug Marshall’s Advice for the Unapologetically Well-Groomed Man

The tastemaker shares what he’s learned along his personal beauty journey.


Artful Living | Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Photography by Ben Ritter

Bobbi Brown’s Top 20 Beauty Tips of All Time

The undeniable queen of natural beauty shares her best insight to let your beauty shine.


Artful Living | Artful Living’s Top 10 Beauty Stories from the Archives

Photography provided by Laurie Crutchfield

Remembering the Legacy of Charles Crutchfield III, MD

Robyne Robinson remembers the life of the renowned dermatologist, philanthropist and artist.

Artful Living: Minneapolis Artists Bring John Biggers’ Iconic Northside Mural Back to Life

Artful Living: Minneapolis Artists Bring John Biggers’ Iconic Northside Mural Back to Life

In 1996, nationally recognized artist John Biggers painted his “Celebration of Life” mural on a sound wall of Olson Memorial Highway in one of the city’s predominantly Black areas. The locality had once thrived with businesses, homes and shops, only to be crippled when Highway 55 — one of the first urban freeways — was built through the heart of the neighborhood in the 1930s. Known for creating works influenced by African myths and symbols, Biggers painted the 160-foot mural to be seen from I-94 like a way-finding sign for Near North, better known as North Minneapolis.

It wasn’t long afterward that the city of Minneapolis decided to build Heritage Park, an affordable housing project along Olson Memorial Highway, right where Biggers’ mural stood. It was demolished in 2000, and two years later, the iconic artist passed away.

The pain and anger of the community ran deep. “The mural’s destruction underscored the need to preserve and celebrate such cultural landmarks,” says artist and Juxtaposition Arts’ Chief Cultural Producer Roger Cummings, who was one of the apprentices on the project. “It made Biggers’ legacy an essential reminder of the significance of art in a community’s identity and unity.”

In 2010, a small group met with City Public Art director Mary Altman to talk about the idea of creating a memorial that honored not only Biggers’ work but his dedication to “planting seeds” — developing young Black artists’ careers, like Ta-coumba Aiken, who worked on the original mural. The John Biggers Seed Project was born. Heather Doyle and Victoria Lauing with the Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center jumped on board and discussed building a new kiln (one of the largest in the country) to create large-scale artwork in enameled steel and training other creatives to help in the process. Artists began working with more than 60 volunteers every week to prep and coat the steel in order to have it ready to install on the Olson Memorial Highway bridge.

But there were setbacks: The 2007 collapse of the I-35W bridge became the No. 1 focus for the city and the Department of Transportation. Changing plans for the bridge created more delays. Then, the global pandemic shut down all installation plans until this year. “Everyone worked together,” says Aiken. “There were hard times, like leaving [the Fire Arts Center] late at night and getting stopped by the police. But it’s amazing.”

“Losing the ‘Celebration of Life’ was an enormous loss for the community; it had to be made up,” says Altman. Artists like Aiken credit her with leading the push for the Seed Project to flourish, despite the obstacles. “It’s important to have this African imagery in the public realm,” she says, referring to Biggers and the works of many of Minneapolis’s Black artists. “This mural is bringing that back.”

The last enamel panel of the John Biggers Seed Project was recently set in place and the project was finalized in late September. “By educating people about African American art and community history, it cultivates a sense of place,” says Cummings, who grew up not far from the “Celebration of Life” mural. “It links the Northside and downtown. This project strengthens community identity and empowers artists to shape their environment at a time of city change with adjacent development.”

Aiken was a little more spiritual about his journey: “It’s like a phoenix rising. The ‘Celebration of Life’ never should have been torn down. But things happen for a reason. Now, there’s new life and new focus on what’s happening in our society.”

By Robyne Robinson

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The Art of John Biggers: View from the Upper Room

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