Art Shanty Projects 2024 Artists + Performers – Minneapolis, MN

Art Shanty Projects 2024 Artists + Performers – Minneapolis, MN

Photo: Max Haynes

Art Shanty Projects is returning to Bdé Umáŋ / Lake Harriet in South Minneapolis, Saturday, January 20th thru Thursday, February 1th, 2024. The month-long program features sonically satisfying, visually dazzling and community-engaged offerings that embrace the challenges and opportunities of winter through immersive, adventuresome, participatory art.

We are proud to host these artists in celebration of our 20 years of weird & wonderful winters!

Check out the program overview and individual project pages for all the fun details!

SHANTIES

Close-Knit Pavilion
Sundus Al-Bayati, Amelia Rosenbush, Kate Zimmerman

Curious Cairns
Karly Bergmann, Lauryl Bergmann, Ben Paul

Free Store Shanty
Shanty Friends Supergroup

Frozen Myth: Mastering Winter Shadows
Kara Faye Gregory, Jesus Li

Hot Box: Disco Inferno
Joe Fagerhaugh, Jei Herald-Zamora, Nick Knutson, Morgan Lust, Ryan North

La Casa de los Sueños de Colores 2.0
Alexander Aleman,  Mikha Dominguez

Magical Nature Center and Conservation Area
Eva Adderley, Dan DeMarco, Waverly Booth, Zara TM, Mary Jo Nikolai

Mesmerized by Books: Banned Book Reading Room
Cyrus Carlson, Jerry Carlson, Rachel Coyne

NatureGrafter
Robin Garwood and Sam Price

Northern Star Film Studio
Greg Bates, Jason Buranen, Sam Granum, Shannon Troy Jones, Michael LoPresti

Performance Stage
Anthony Chapin, Louis Kaufman, Richard Parnell

Reduce Reuse Re-Xylophone
Mady Gulon; Marshall King; Jakob Mahla; Derek Ronding

Time.Light.Color.
Alan Berg, Elisabeth Farrell, Bridget Lynch, Ian Nystrom

Tiny Treasure House
Team Treasure

Welcome Shanty
Designed and constructed by students at the University of Minnesota School of Architecture. Remodeled and staffed by the board members of Art Shanty Projects.

Wicked Winter
Wicked Winter Witches

PERFORMANCES + ART ACTIONS

Atop the Above
Felicia Cooper

Community Sing on Ice
Sarina Partridge

fro-gahhh: yoga for the planet and the people
Bridges through Yoga

Hula Hoop Hoopla
Minneapolis Hoop Jams

Ice Pirate Radio
Sebura&Gartelmann

Kith + Kin On Ice
Kith + Kin Chorus

Klezmer on Ice
rafa kern, Sarah Larsson, Or Levinson, Josh Rosard, Ilya Shneyveys, Danny Lentz, Pat O’Keefe, Caleb Likely, Di Bayke Klezmer Band

Ladies of the Lost Continent
Monica Rojas

Lady Bear Returns!
Tony Chapin, Kim Ford, Meg Juedes, Merrill Stringer, Robert Werling, Sherry Zimmerman

OPM Painter Present: Still Life Painting when Life Won’t Stand Still
Winter Plein Air Painters from Outdoor Painters of Minnesota

Pollinator Frenzy
Terry McDaniel & the Minnesota Native Pollinators

Prairie Fire Lady Choir
Prairie Fire Lady Choir

Taiko on Ice
TaikoArts Midwest

Thakápsičapi
Twin Cities Native Lacrosse

The World’s Only Wearable Art Contraption Parade on Ice!
ArtStart and Minnesota ArtCars

Three Ring Goose Circus
Henry Kneiszel, Alyssa Lucas, Jess Morgan

Winter Life Outta Sight
Will Bjorndal

Map, amenities, and performance schedule (and a few more projects!) to be announced later in November!

A giant zoetrope shanty made of shiny metallic material
Wurtele Thrust Stage – Guthrie Theater: A Christmas Carol – Minneapolis, MN

Wurtele Thrust Stage – Guthrie Theater: A Christmas Carol – Minneapolis, MN

A Christmas Carol

 …

by CHARLES DICKENS
adapted by LAVINA JADHWANI
directed by ADDIE GORLIN-HAN
based on the original direction by JOSEPH HAJ

A miserly and miserable man, Ebenezer Scrooge greets each Christmas with “Bah! Humbug!” until he is visited one Christmas Eve by the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present and Christmas Future. In Charles Dickens’ beloved classic, the three spirits show Scrooge happy memories from his past, difficult realities from the present and a grim future should he continue his closed-hearted ways. Throughout his journey, Scrooge is forced to reckon with the man he has become and contemplate the man he could be — but only if his restless night leads to a change of heart by morning.

 

Winterers’ Gathering & Arctic Film Festival – Grand Marais, MN

Winterers’ Gathering & Arctic Film Festival – Grand Marais, MN

Winterers’ Gathering & Arctic Film Festival

Winter is the longest and most defining season in the North. Celebrate the crafts, customs, history, and stories that have been inspired by winter at the Winterers’ Gathering & Arctic Film Festival. Featuring winter-centric coursework, a winter tent camp, gear sale, film festival, and more, this is a classic event to welcome the chilliest season.

Arctic Film Festival

On-campus courses

Chili Feed, The Great Gear & Ski Sale, Contra Dance

Featured Speaker Tim Cahill

Request A Catalog

About

Winter is the longest and most defining season in the North. With snowy days and dark nights, this season is a time both for outdoor adventure and for gathering to share traditions, meals, and stories.

The Winterers’ Gathering & Arctic Film Festival celebrates the crafts, customs, history, and stories that have been inspired by winter. Featuring winter-centric coursework, a winter tent camp, gear sale, film festival, speakers, and more, this is a classic event to welcome the start of the chilliest season.

This year’s Winterers’ Gathering will welcome instructors John Beltman, Ted Gephart, Scott Graden, Bryan Hansel, and Mary Sannerud to teach courses on campus during the event. Coursework is paired with evenings of inspiring films about northern life and community gatherings such as a contra dance, featured speaker event, and more.

Event

Winterers’ Gathering & Arctic Film Festival

Thursday, November 16th @ 9:00 am – Sunday, November 19th @ 5:00 pm

Location

500 W Hwy 61
Grand Marais, MN

ICYMI

The Norwegian American: Scandinavian Almond Cake—simply a delight!

 

 

Artful Living: Minneapolis Artists Bring John Biggers’ Iconic Northside Mural Back to Life

Artful Living: Minneapolis Artists Bring John Biggers’ Iconic Northside Mural Back to Life

In 1996, nationally recognized artist John Biggers painted his “Celebration of Life” mural on a sound wall of Olson Memorial Highway in one of the city’s predominantly Black areas. The locality had once thrived with businesses, homes and shops, only to be crippled when Highway 55 — one of the first urban freeways — was built through the heart of the neighborhood in the 1930s. Known for creating works influenced by African myths and symbols, Biggers painted the 160-foot mural to be seen from I-94 like a way-finding sign for Near North, better known as North Minneapolis.

It wasn’t long afterward that the city of Minneapolis decided to build Heritage Park, an affordable housing project along Olson Memorial Highway, right where Biggers’ mural stood. It was demolished in 2000, and two years later, the iconic artist passed away.

The pain and anger of the community ran deep. “The mural’s destruction underscored the need to preserve and celebrate such cultural landmarks,” says artist and Juxtaposition Arts’ Chief Cultural Producer Roger Cummings, who was one of the apprentices on the project. “It made Biggers’ legacy an essential reminder of the significance of art in a community’s identity and unity.”

In 2010, a small group met with City Public Art director Mary Altman to talk about the idea of creating a memorial that honored not only Biggers’ work but his dedication to “planting seeds” — developing young Black artists’ careers, like Ta-coumba Aiken, who worked on the original mural. The John Biggers Seed Project was born. Heather Doyle and Victoria Lauing with the Chicago Avenue Fire Arts Center jumped on board and discussed building a new kiln (one of the largest in the country) to create large-scale artwork in enameled steel and training other creatives to help in the process. Artists began working with more than 60 volunteers every week to prep and coat the steel in order to have it ready to install on the Olson Memorial Highway bridge.

But there were setbacks: The 2007 collapse of the I-35W bridge became the No. 1 focus for the city and the Department of Transportation. Changing plans for the bridge created more delays. Then, the global pandemic shut down all installation plans until this year. “Everyone worked together,” says Aiken. “There were hard times, like leaving [the Fire Arts Center] late at night and getting stopped by the police. But it’s amazing.”

“Losing the ‘Celebration of Life’ was an enormous loss for the community; it had to be made up,” says Altman. Artists like Aiken credit her with leading the push for the Seed Project to flourish, despite the obstacles. “It’s important to have this African imagery in the public realm,” she says, referring to Biggers and the works of many of Minneapolis’s Black artists. “This mural is bringing that back.”

The last enamel panel of the John Biggers Seed Project was recently set in place and the project was finalized in late September. “By educating people about African American art and community history, it cultivates a sense of place,” says Cummings, who grew up not far from the “Celebration of Life” mural. “It links the Northside and downtown. This project strengthens community identity and empowers artists to shape their environment at a time of city change with adjacent development.”

Aiken was a little more spiritual about his journey: “It’s like a phoenix rising. The ‘Celebration of Life’ never should have been torn down. But things happen for a reason. Now, there’s new life and new focus on what’s happening in our society.”

By Robyne Robinson

doitnnorth shop/share gallery

The Art of John Biggers: View from the Upper Room

MIA: “In Our Hands: Native Photography, 1890 to Now” – Minneapolis, MN

MIA: “In Our Hands: Native Photography, 1890 to Now” – Minneapolis, MN

Cara Romero, Chemehuevi, born 1977, TV Indians, 2017, archival inkjet print, Courtesy of the artist © Cara Romero

We’re excited to announce our next special exhibition, “In Our Hands: Native Photography, 1890 to Now.”

Minneapolis Institute of Art: Enter into the vivid worlds of Native photography, as framed by generations of First Nations, Métis, Inuit, and Native American photographers themselves. Presenting over 150 photographs of, by, and for Indigenous people, “In Our Hands” welcomes all to see through the lens held by Native photographers.
Organized by a council of primarily Native artists, scholars, and knowledge sharers, in partnership with Mia curators, this sweeping exhibition traces the intersecting histories of photography and diverse Indigenous cultures from the Rio Grande to the Arctic Circle. Beautiful, complex, and surprising, these artworks celebrate the legacy of groundbreaking photographers and their influence on the medium today.
Native American Heritage Month is celebrated to honor the remarkable Native Americans each November who have contributed a lot to improve the character of the nation.

Event

  “In Our Hands: Native Photography, 1890 to Now” 

Target Gallery

Shadows & Spirits of the State Capitol – St. Paul, MN

Shadows & Spirits of the State Capitol – St. Paul, MN

Thursday, October 26th, 6:30PM

Tickets

$11-15/MNHS members save 20%

Additional Tours

Shadows & Spirits of the State Capitol

Friday, October 27th at 6:30 PM

Shadows & Spirits of the State Capitol

Saturday, October 28th at 7:00 PM

Location

75 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd

St. PaulMN

ICYMI

The 8 Most Sought-After Haircuts Of Fall 2023

error: Content is protected !!

Pin It on Pinterest