Great Lakes Company: Minnesota Landmark Prints

Great Lakes Company: Minnesota Landmark Prints

Link to view these Minnesota Landmark Prints and for many more from Great Lakes Co.
Print - Itasca State Park

OUR STORIES

 

As kids, summers meant escaping to the lake. Whether it was taking the boat out at sunset, sharing stories around the bonfire, or jumping off a well-worn dock, life was simply better at the lake. From Summer excursions to Northern Minnesota and weekend jaunts to Hayward, Wisconsin – some of our most vivid memories were created with friends and family around the lake.

Great Lakes has always been a product of the values we were raised on. We were taught to work hard but always find time to enjoy the finer things in life. To seek adventure and be proud of where you come from. We work tirelessly to infuse these values into our brand, our products, and the way we do business.

 

DAVID BURKE
co-founder

Roy Lake in Northern Minnesota was my escape for the summer. There’s something about leaving behind the hustle and bustle of city-life that was so relaxing. Usually with friends and family, our days consisted of tubing, water-skiing, swimming in the middle of the lake and fileting fish for dinner. The simple, carefree lifestyle at Roy Lake was something I always looked forward to and has provided much of the inspiration behind the Great Lakes brand.

 

SPENCER BARRETT
co-founder

Growing up for me meant Summers at the cabin on Round Lake in Hayward, WI. We’d spend countless hours jumping off the dock, sharing stories around the bonfire, counting the satellites at night, and just enjoying each others company. We recently had to sell the cabin but I’m incredibly thankful for those memories and I continue to draw from them every single day.

Happy Pride Month!

Happy Pride Month!

Photo by Patrick Forslund Photography
Kare11: Learn more about Pride in the Twin Cities and ways you can support LGBTQ+ youth impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

MINNEAPOLIS — The return of LGBTQ Pride month amid a retreat of COVID-19 cases across the United States, means Pride parties and parades are set to resume in cities across the country after a year of pandemic cancellations.

The return of those annual celebrations is a hopeful sign for many in the LGBTQ community, but Dr. Angela Kade Goepferd, Medical Director of the Gender Health Program at Children’s Minnesota, says the parades and public gatherings represent a lifeline to many LGBTQ young people.

“I think its particularly hard for LGBTQ kids, when these events disappear,” Dr. Goepferd said, during an interview with KARE11 last June. “For LGBTQ kids that physical distance and social distance when schools closed was really particularly hard. Youth tend to come out to their peers first, and then at home, so they lost that social network.”

In the year since Dr. Goepferd first expressed concern about the impact on LGBTQ youth, she says the problem only grew.

“What I have seen in the kids that I’ve taken care of is increased depression, anxiety, increased feelings of isolation, feeling they are at home with parents who don’t understand their identity,” Dr. Goepferd said. “(Parents) may not respect their identities or use their name and pronoun. That’s a lot of what I’ve been seeing and, nationally, that’s what we’ve been seeing as well.”

According to a new national survey conducted by the Trevor Project – a national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGBTQ youth – 42% of LGBTQ youth reported seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year, while 48% could not access the mental health care they desired.

“That tells me that we have a mental health crisis in this country for all kids, I think, in general,” Dr. Goepferd said. “One thing that we’ve seen here at Children’s Minnesota is that, since the pandemic, our Emergency Department has been filling up with kids who are in mental health crisis. I think that a lot of kids are experiencing increased depression, anxiety and suicidality, and unable to access the services that they need. For LGBTQ kids, the pool of resources gets even smaller.”

And unlike their peers, Dr. Goepferd says LGBTQ youth have a harder time finding support at home. According to the Trevor Project survey 80% of LGBTQ youth reported that COVID-19 made their living situation more stressful, and only one-third of young people reported living in a home that is LGBTQ-affirming.

“So two-thirds of kids did not feel supported by their parents at home, versus about 50% of kids who feel supported in school,” Dr. Goepferd said.

With many students now back in school, Dr. Goepferd says she’s beginning to see more LGBTQ youth reconnect with their peers and support systems, but she says the return of Pride events, in person, promises an even more powerful hope on the horizon.

“It’s a different way to celebrate identity,” she said. “So often we talk about accepting kids or loving kids, but we don’t use the word celebration very often. Pride is just one big huge celebration. It’s visual, it’s community, it’s a way to say, not only is it okay that you are LGBTQ, it’s great.”

While the big celebrations are impactful, Dr. Goepferd says simply loving and supporting someone for who they are has shown to be one of the most powerful actions to help LGBTQ youth. She says young people who report being loved and supported for who they are, have far better mental health outcomes and far lower rates of attempted suicide.

If you are thinking about suicide and in need of immediate support, you can call the TrevorLifeline at 1-866-488-7386, text START to 678-678 or click here for online support.

 Kent Erdahl

Happy #Pride month to all our LGBTQ friends and family.

We love you, we support you and we’re proud to have you as a part of our community! 

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